Health Library Explorer
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A-Z Listings Contact Us
Pediatric Health Library
Translate
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Topic IndexLibrary Index
Click a letter to see a list of conditions beginning with that letter.
Click 'Topic Index' to return to the index for the current topic.
Click 'Library Index' to return to the listing of all topics.

Gene Study Helps Advance Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis

MONDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers who identified 105 new genetic mutations that cause cystic fibrosis say their findings will improve diagnosis and could increase the number of patients who receive individualized drug treatment.

Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder that causes a buildup of thick mucus in the lungs, resulting in frequent lung infections, breathing problems and decreased lung function. Eventually, the repeated infections destroy the lungs.

More than 1,900 mutations had already been identified in the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis, but it was unclear how many of them actually contribute to the disease.

In this study, researchers analyzed genetic information from nearly 40,000 cystic fibrosis patients in order to determine which of the 1,900 mutations are benign and which are harmful. Their findings increased the number of mutations known to cause cystic fibrosis from 22 to 127.

The study was published online Aug. 25 in the journal Nature Genetics.

Identification of these additional mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene will bring certainty to families about whether someone has cystic fibrosis or is a carrier, and will also help efforts to design new drugs that target specific mutations. There is already one such drug on the market.

"Since not all mutations cause disease, sequencing the DNA in both copies of your CFTR gene and finding an abnormality in one wouldn't tell us if you are a carrier for [cystic fibrosis] unless we knew if that abnormality causes [cystic fibrosis]," Dr. Garry Cutting, a professor of pediatrics in the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a Hopkins news release.

"Until this new work, more than a quarter of couples in which both partners were found to carry a CFTR mutation were left wondering if their mutations were going to affect their offspring. Now it's down to 9 percent," he explained.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about cystic fibrosis.

SOURCE: Johns Hopkins Medicine, news release, Aug. 25, 2013

Online Medical Reviewer: Louise Akin, RN, BSN
Online Medical Reviewer: Daphne Pierce-Smith, RN, MSN, FNP, CCRC
Date Last Reviewed: 8/26/2013
Copyright ©2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
Powered By Krames StayWell
Copyright © Krames StayWell except where otherwise noted.
About Us
  • Follow Us On:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Health Hub
  • Pinterest
  • Google+
  • YouTube
  • RSS
  •  
  • Bookmark and Share
© Brigham and Women's Hospital | 75 Francis Street, Boston MA 02115 | 617-732-5500