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Estazolam tablets

What is this medicine?

ESTAZOLAM (es TA zoe lam) is a benzodiazepine. It is used to treat insomnia. This medicine helps you to fall asleep and sleep through the night.

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each new prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • confusion

  • loss of balance or coordination

  • signs and symptoms of low blood pressure like dizziness; feeling faint or lightheaded, falls; unusually weak or tired

  • suicidal thoughts or other mood changes

  • unusual activities while asleep like driving, eating, making phone calls

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • dizziness

  • dry mouth

  • tiredness

  • upset stomach

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • narcotic medicines for cough

  • sodium oxybate

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alcohol

  • antihistamines for allergy, cough and cold

  • certain medicines for anxiety or sleep

  • certain medicines for depression, like amitriptyline, fluoxetine, sertraline

  • certain medicines for fungal infections like ketoconazole and itraconazole

  • certain medicines for seizures like carbamazepine, phenobarbital, primidone

  • general anesthetics like lidocaine, pramoxine, tetracaine

  • MAOIs like Carbex, Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, and Parnate

  • medicines that relax muscles for surgery

  • narcotic medicines for pain

  • phenothiazines like chlorpromazine, mesoridazine, prochlorperazine, thioridazine

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children. This medicine can be abused. Keep your medicine in a safe place to protect it from theft. Do not share this medicine with anyone. Selling or giving away this medicine is dangerous and against the law.

This medicine may cause accidental overdose and death if taken by other adults, children, or pets. Mix any unused medicine with a substance like cat litter or coffee grounds. Then throw the medicine away in a sealed container like a sealed bag or a coffee can with a lid. Do not use the medicine after the expiration date.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Protect from light. Keep container tightly closed.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • glaucoma

  • history of drug or alcohol abuse problem

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • lung or breathing disease, like asthma

  • mental illness

  • myasthenia gravis

  • Parkinson's disease

  • suicidal thoughts, plans, or attempt; a previous suicide attempt by you or a family member

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to estazolam, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or health care professional if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse.

Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice. You may develop a severe reaction. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. To reduce the risk of dizzy and fainting spells, do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. Alcohol may increase dizziness and drowsiness. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

If you are taking another medicine that also causes drowsiness, you may have more side effects. Give your health care provider a list of all medicines you use. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. Do not take more medicine than directed. Call emergency for help if you have problems breathing or unusual sleepiness.

After taking this medicine for sleep, you may get up out of bed while not being fully awake and do an activity that you do not know you are doing. The next morning, you may have no memory of the event. Activities such as driving a car ("sleep-driving"), making and eating food, talking on the phone, sexual activity, and sleep-walking have been reported. Call your doctor right away if you find out you have done any of these activities. Do not take this medicine if you drink alcohol or have taken another medicine for sleep, since your risk of doing these sleep-related activities will be increased.

Do not take this medicine unless you are able to stay in bed for a full night (7 to 8 hours) before you must be active again. You may have a decrease in mental alertness the day after use, even if you feel that you are fully awake. Tell your doctor if you will need to perform activities requiring full alertness, such as driving, the next day. Do not stand or sit up quickly after taking this medicine, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells.

If you or your family notice any changes in your behavior, such as new or worsening depression, thoughts of harming yourself, anxiety, other unusual or disturbing thoughts, or memory loss, call your doctor right away.

After you stop taking this medicine, you may have trouble falling asleep. This is called rebound insomnia. This problem usually goes away on its own after 1 or 2 nights.

Women should inform their doctor if they wish to become pregnant or think they might be pregnant. There is a potential for serious side effects to an unborn child. Talk to your health care professional or pharmacist for more information.

NOTE:This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider. Copyright© 2016 Gold Standard
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